Aggressive Driving

Motivations for Speeding, Volume 1: Summary Report, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, August 2012. 

This is Volume I of a three-volume report. It contains the results of a study that examined the speeding behaviour of drivers in their own vehicles over the course of three to four weeks of naturalistic driving in urban (Seattle, Washington) and rural (College Station, Texas) settings. The purpose of this research was to (1) identify the reasons why drivers speed, (2) model the relative roles of situational, demographic, and personality factors in predicting travel speeds, (3) classify speeders, and (4) identify interventions, countermeasures, and strategies for reducing speeding behaviours.

Aggressive Driving - NHTSA's Module on Aggressive Driving

"Aggressive Driving Enforcement: Strategies for Implementing Best Practices." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.

The purpose of this guide is to provide step-by-step assistance to law enforcement personnel to develop an aggressive driving enforcement program. A number of suggestions are provided that will help law enforcement agencies design and implement an effective aggressive driving program.

"Speeding and Highway Safety: The U.S. Department of Transportation's Policy and Implementation Strategy." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: February, 1997.

"Definitions Related to Speed." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.

This glossary contains terms, tools, and programs for speed management. It provides information for law enforcement agencies that want to develop or expand special speed enforcement activities. Government officials, concerned citizens, and other individuals interested in supporting these activities can use this information to learn more about speed and enforcement activities.

"Summary of State Speed Laws Fifth Edition." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: January, 2001.

This summary reports only the statutes of state statutes (or regulations) that are concerned with either speed limit or speed related violations. Local laws are not reported. Unless otherwise indicated, the state laws (or regulations) are current as of January 1, 2001.

"Think Fast Brochure." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.

This brochure describes the cost of speeding to society. It also touches on youth and speeding as well as economic and environmental costs of speeding.

"Evaluation of the Aggression Suppression Program of Milwaukee, Wisconsin." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: May, 2001.

In sum, the Aggression Suppression Program demonstrated the effects of targeted enforcement. More citations were issued for aggressive driving types of violations (that is, not just speed tickets were issued); motorist behaviour changed at targeted intersections; and crash reduction was demonstrated citywide, with greater reductions on corridors with targeted enforcement. Future programs of this type would be enhanced if they could generate more visible and more focused media attention.

"Capital Beltway Update: Beltway User Focus Groups." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: April, 1998.

This report documents the results of focus groups run during May, 1997 for the Safety Team. Of the eight groups conducted: three were composed of representative Beltway drivers of private passenger vehicles; two were composed of specifically selected "aggressive drivers;" and three were composed of commercial truck drivers. Procedures followed those used in 1994 for a similar study. The results indicated that roadway design and maintenance issues were of less concern to focus group participants in 1997 as compared with 1994 likely reflecting Beltway improvements made during the last three years. Unsafe driving behaviours, including aggressive driving, were of more concern. Focus group participants supported information, education, licensing and congestion reduction countermeasures. They also supported vigorous law enforcement of traffic laws even knowing that law enforcement presence would add to traffic congestion.

Nerup, Penny, et al. "Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks in Washington State: High Visibility Enforcement Applied to Share the Road Safety." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: May, 2006.

Selective Traffic Enforcement Programs (sTEPS) have been used effectively for many years to change motorists' traffic behaviours in a very short period of time. The Click It or Ticket (CIOT) model is a well-known sTEP and is associated with an impressive increase in safety belt use across the nation in the past few years (Solomon et al, 2002). A sTEP model typically relies heavily on enforcement of a State's traffic safety laws (safety belts in CIOT) supported by intensive paid publicity that focuses on enforcement. The model includes: 1) data collection before, during and after media and enforcement phases; 2) earned and paid publicity announcing vigorous enforcement; 3) highly visible enforcement each day of a two week enforcement period; and 4) a media event announcing program results and thanking all the participants in the community.

"Aggressive Driving and the Law: A Symposium." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: May, 1999.

On January 22-23, 1999, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) brought together an array of public safety, legal, and adjudication representatives to participate in an "Aggressive Driving and the Law" Symposium. The symposium sought to derive action steps toward solving the problem of aggressive driving, approached from six different perspectives: (1) statutory approaches, (2) applied technology, (3) charging decisions, (4) sentencing strategies, (5) community leadership, and (6) enforcement strategies. These six categories served as topic areas for framing participant discussions and resulting recommendations developed in breakout sessions.

"Guidelines for Developing a High-Visibility Enforcement Campaign to Reduce Unsafe Driving Behaviors among Drivers of Passenger and Commercial Motor Vehicles." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.

This guide is intended for state highway safety, law enforcement, and other professionals who work in the field of commercial vehicle safety. It provides guidelines for implementing a STEP to reduce unsafe driving behaviours among drivers of commercial and passenger motor vehicles. It draws on examples and lessons learned from the successful high-visibility enforcement campaign known as TACT (Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks), which was developed in Washington State.

"Aggressive Driving: Prosecutor's Planner." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: January, 2001.

NHTSA research shows that compliance with, and support for, traffic laws can be increased through aggressive, targeted enforcement combined with a vigorous public information and education program. As a prosecutor with the power and influence to make a significant impact on behalf of concerned citizens, you have many avenues for leading your community in the fight against dangerous drivers.

"Guidelines for Developing a Municipal Speed Enforcement Program." U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.

The purpose of this document is to provide step-by-step guidance to both law enforcement and civilian personnel to assist with the development of traffic safety program support committees and the implementation of municipal speed enforcement and other special traffic safety programs.