Bicycles

Easy Steps to Properly Fit a Bicycle Helmet.” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.
It’s not enough to simply buy a bicycle helmet – it should be properly fitted, adjusted, and worn each time you ride.

Demonstrating Bicycle Helmet Effectiveness: A How-To Guide.” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.
This guide provides the necessary instructions to demonstrate helmet effectiveness for different age groups. Demonstrations to show effectiveness of bicycle helmets use a mixture of shock value, hands-on learning, group activity and open discussion to deliver the vital message – wear a helmet every time you ride a bicycle!

Bicycle Helmet Use Laws.” Traffic Safety Facts: Laws. U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: January, 2008.
The NHTSA supports the enactment of bicycle helmet use laws. Bicycle helmets offer bicyclists the best protection from head injuries resulting from bicycle crashes, and bicycle helmet laws have proved effective in increasing bicycle helmet use.

"Bicyclists and Other Cyclists." Traffic Safety Facts: 2012 Data. U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: 2014.

Bicycles - NHTSA's Bicycles Module

The Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute. http://www.bhsi.org.

Shinkle, David. “Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety.” Transportation Review. National Conference of State Legislatures. Washington, DC: February, 2012.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety.” (Updated January 2011) National Conference of State Legislatures. Washington, DC.

Encouraging Bicycling and Walking: The State Legislative Role.” National Conference of State Legislatures. Washington, DC.

Safe Routes to School Guide.” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.

Safe Routes to School.” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: September, 2002.
This toolkit resulted from the experiences of the Marin County pilot program and from other Safe Routes to School programs in the United States, in the Canadian province of British Columbia, and in the United Kingdom. We offer this toolkit to others who wish to start a Safe Routes to School program in your school or community.

Safe Routes to School: Practice and Promise.” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: 2004.
If you are a policy maker, program planner, provider of funding or administrator, and are faced with deciding how or even whether to support Safe Routes to School efforts in your area, then this publication is for you.

Bikeability Checklist: How Bikeable is Your Community?” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.
Go for a ride and use this checklist to rate your neighborhood’s bikeability.

Enforcement: Role of Law Enforcement in SRTS.” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.
The purpose of this website is to give law enforcement more information about the program and how they can support local SRTS programs in their community.

Children.” Traffic Safety Facts: 2009 Data. U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: 2010.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety.” Highway Safety Program Guideline No. 14. U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: November, 2006.
This guideline describes the components that a State pedestrian and bicycle safety program should include and the criteria that the program components should meet. Given the multidisciplinary nature of the highway safety problem, implementation of a comprehensive pedestrian and bicycle safety program requires coordination among several State agencies.

National Strategies for Advancing Bicycle Safety.” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC.
The National Strategies for Advancing Bicycle Safety is a call to action for policy makers, educators, advocates, transportation experts, health and injury professionals, and others with an interest in safe bicycling. The strategies encompassed in the document are those that, over the next three to five years, are capable of enhancing bicycle safety for riders of all ages.

A Compendium of NHTSA’s Pedestrian and Bicyclist Traffic Safety Research Projects: 1969-2007.” U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington, DC: July, 2007.
This compendium describes the pedestrian and bicyclist safety research conducted by the Office of Behavioral Safety Research and its predecessor organizations during the period 1969–2007. The compendium begins with a description of the structure and philosophy of the NHTSA pedestrian and bicycle research programs. It is followed by a section that describes the research on the development of taxonomies of crash types, since the results of that research formed the foundation for many of the subsequent NHTSA pedestrian and bicycle research studies. A chronological listing of major activities that occurred in the decades spanned by NHTSA’s pedestrian and bicyclist research programs is then presented. The final section discusses lessons learned from the pedestrian and bicycle research activities.

Motorcycles - NHTSA's Motorcycle Module